Road Rage Review

Set in the backdrop of a martial law setting, with so many makings of a good game in place – Maximum Games manages to rush out an incomplete product for the holiday season which was perhaps just another half of a year in the oven away from a good game.

Instead of that possibly favorable outcome, had Team 6 been given more time to finish this body of work, players are met with a title that can’t even full-screen properly, has horrendous controls, missing animations, and menus that are straight up with the vibe of an amateur homebrew game built for Windows 95.

At first this could be taken as a reference in design techniques performed on purpose in order to match up with vibes from its clear inspiration, Road Rash. Pressing on, players will find a ton of levels that essentially ask the same thing from the player – bear with the awful controls to complete missions that would’ve probably been just fun enough to work out in a polished game.

The game-breaking low quality of animations and story being told through a collage of mixed formats, all of which are very much out of date, makes it seem like the developers took remaking Road Rash as a homework assignment more than an art form – with literal mimicking of art styles but a lack of refinement and tuning to ensure the feel would be the same. It’s going to be a very huge disappointment for Road Rash fans indeed.

Some extras were thrown into the game in an attempt to eventually make this more like a Grand Theft Auto type of experience, and if you play for yourself you’ll notice the small hints here and there of that presentation style. Perhaps Maximum Games had just reached too far in their ambition and ran out of money, but Road Rage being released in this state leaves little hope of such grandeur intents really being meaningful in the end. This should have never been pushed out in its current state. Regardless of original plans to make a great game, there just isn’t much left to say about Road Rage that isn’t unpleasant to hear for gamers.

To be specific, it feels like driving the motorcycle in Road Rage is akin to piloting an ice rink during your first time skating. That never gets better. It isn’t because you’re new to the game and need to upgrade you’re ride – it’s because Road Rage has that poor of physics.

Missions are all the same; ride around waiting for your cell phone to give you targets to kill or race, struggle to steer this ‘worse than the original’ imitation of a game through senseless checkpoints (they call it ‘open-world’ then have mandatory paths), and watch yourself battle to the death in a glitchy, unsatisfying mess of a title.

Weapons are all the same exact thing. The only real difference is how it looks visually to the player, and since the graphics engine in this title is nothing to write home about – who cares? Sound effects and music are uninspired and don’t really do any help in saving the game either. Multiplayer might as well not even be there since it’s a competition of who is better at fighting the most annoying and basic controls and physics which are actually worse than they were in the 90s. And the so-called ‘Open World’ was just a lazy way of shoving everything onto one map in which all terrain looks identical.

Road Rage is a lot of work wasted in a title that could’ve been great, but instead is not even good. It pains us to be so brutally honest, but without being given the decorum of basic standards it feels like Team 6 and Maximum Games have disrespected gamers by cashing in on a long-gone, beloved genre that they couldn’t live up to. By the time word gets around about how bad this game is, it ultimately will hurt the genre it intended to help and probably not achieve the sales it was likely expected to bring in. Road Rage gets a 3 out of 10, Below Bronze RGN Rating and is not recommended.

Rating: 3 / 10

RGN Rating: Below Bronze
Developer: Team 6
Publisher: Maximum Games
Available On: PS4, Xbox ONE, PC
Played On: PC

Release Date: November 7, 2017

Review Copy Info: A digital copy of this game was provided for free to RealGamerNewZ by the publisher for the purpose of this review.