Tag Archives: are lootboxes gambling?

EA Games stock market share value continues to slide downward

While a number of financial withdrawals of support have taken place (both scheduled and unexpected), as well as consumer backlash leading to a general lack of interest in upcoming titles, the value of EA Games in the stock market has been taking a continual dip. While most journalists and gamers may not have noticed, EA Games has been steadily sliding in a downward spiral as the lack of hype around their games produces a chilling effect on investor confidence. Continue reading EA Games stock market share value continues to slide downward

Another Bad Omen: Chief Design Officer Patrick Söderlund is leaving EA Games

Shortly after E3 2018, which saw one of the worst EA Press Conferences of all time many Bioware veterans have been jumping off the Anthem train. It now appears that the exodus of staff who are needed for the success of our industry’s latest “live service” may not just be limited to game developers.

Patrick Söderlund (Chief Design Officer) announced to employees today that he will be exiting his role at EA Games over the course of the next three months. This also comes on the heels of Blake Jorgensen (COO & CFO at EA Games) selling over a million and a half ($1,503,967) worth of EA stock options in early July of 2018. These all seem to be bad signs of what is to come.

Continue reading Another Bad Omen: Chief Design Officer Patrick Söderlund is leaving EA Games

Entertainment Software Association president Mike Gallagher out of touch, defends loot box scandal

Perhaps one of the last holdouts on the notion that lootboxes aren’t gambling and are ‘A-Okay’, ESA Prez Mike Gallagher took it a step further at Nordic Game Conference at Malmö Central Station in Malmo, Sweden this previous week by championing the well-hated lootbox mechanic as a source of massive revenue increases. In a long-winded, inaccurate, dry speech given to attendees Gallagher argued that lootboxes never left players upset and never “took their money without giving them something”. Belittling government authorities that have banned lootboxes in video games such as Belgium and the Netherlands, Gallagher simply called these “the lowest common denominator” and sought out to discredit those bodies which have done the research and concluded their findings that lootboxes are dangerous items that will lead to long-term addiction and gambling problems for players of games which contain them.

Many journalists, gamers, and developers have often been on the side of self-regulation for the game industry, which Ghallager goes on to promote. However, the opening up of the conversation beginning with such an avid defense of lootboxes perhaps proves that the authorities currently in place to do such self-regulation can no longer be trusted to keep the best interest of gamers in mind. Gaming has always grown massively year over year, and without the help of predatory lootbox micro-transactions that cause addiction and gambling neural pathways to develop in the human brain. This attempt to combine fear of government regulation with defense of lootboxes proves that the ESA cannot be trusted as an ally to gamers anymore.

While a good amount of this mainly empty power-point presentation from Mike Ghallager argued against lootbox regulation, there were a few other strange anti-consumer points attempting to be made as well. Simply allowing predatory or poorly designed monetization systems to roll out in mainstream games then later be patched via feedback was trotted out as a worthy solution to the current problems of the industry. A label of “in-game purchases” that doesn’t specify lootboxes from micro-transactions or expansive downloadable content was also given as a reason why self-regulation is supposedly working. Video game addiction becoming a World Health Organization classification was brought up as well as USA’s research on the potential link between mass shootings and violent video games (which ultimately ended up undecided).

Ghallager attempted to paint the picture of an innocent game industry that did nothing wrong and was under attack by the big, bad wolf. In reality, Star Wars: Battlefront II destroyed the last remaining bit of belief gamers had in the industry to self-regulate and the ESA is now unable to defend itself against government regulation due to their refusal to hold EA Games and companies like it accountable for their misdeeds. In short, it has become impossible for the ESA to speak out against defamation of the games industry by the World Health Organization and be taken seriously since they have proven they are simply shills for large gaming corporations and don’t care about their own consumers’ well-being.

If Mike Gallagher truly believes the things he said on stage this week, then he’s part of the executive abuse of game developers and video game customers going on which is a plague on this industry. If he doesn’t believe the things he said, and is “just doing his job” as many claim, then he should resign to give some one with more spine a chance to stand up to the forces controlling the ESA through special interest funding deals designed to neuter their ability to represent real gamers.

South Korea punishes game companies for lootboxes with ₩1 Billion Won ($945,200 US Dollars) in fines

With governments around the world finally picking up the slack on their tech knowledge and holding corporate giants accountable for data breaches as well as predatory, anti-consumer practices, South Korea joins the United Kingdom, United States of America, Belgium, and Australia in educating their politicians and going after those tech companies which abuse their power.

An investigation has began to expand in the video games sector of corporate crime as reported by outlets in the sovereign nation just south of the famous conflict zone and they aren’t taking lightly to lootboxes in which players wager money against a desired outcome.

Continue reading South Korea punishes game companies for lootboxes with ₩1 Billion Won ($945,200 US Dollars) in fines

Ex-PlayStation CEO Jack Tretton working against gamers, How the mighty have fallen

Perhaps those politely written goodbyes from Sony and Jack Tretton four years ago were not all that genuine. We don’t know what really led to the end of Jack’s reign as PlayStation CEO for Sony. Helping turn around the PlayStation 3 through serving gamers and re-branding the console with tons of pro-consumer moves and solid game studio investments, perhaps the executive behind those well written speeches got sick of all that customer service. Instead, Jack Tretton now joins a group of vultures in predatory practices against gamers on the board of directors at a company called Scientific Revenue which offers to get players spending double the usual amount on in-game purchases, lootboxes, micro-transactions, DLC, and more.

Continue reading Ex-PlayStation CEO Jack Tretton working against gamers, How the mighty have fallen

Entertainment Software Association Condemns World Health Organization’s “Gaming Addiction: Mental Illness” Ruling

According to the ESA (comprised of various video game interests) the WHO has actually not finalized their ruling of Video Games Addiction as a Mental Illness. Entertainment Software Association member companies currently has its own inner-battles going on due to the recent Lootbox debate where governments are categorizing games containing Lootbox Micro-transactions as Gambling therefore subject to legal regulations.

In a statement made by the ESA as their official reply to a draft created by the World Health Organization classifying gaming addiction as a disease, ESA said this;

“Just like avid sports fans and consumers of all forms of engaging entertainment, gamers are passionate and dedicated with their time. Having captivated gamers for more than four decades, more than 2 billion people around the world enjoy video games.

The World Health Organization knows that common sense and objective research prove video games are not addictive, and, putting that official label on them recklessly trivializes real mental health issues like depression and social anxiety disorder, which deserve treatment and the full attention of the medical community.

We strongly encourage the WHO to reverse direction on its proposed action.”

Sure, the ESA has a lot to say now that the World Health Organization is stepping in, but they can blame themselves for allowing what prompted this to happen-

The Lootbox Gambling Video Game Scandal of 2017.

All of this is hot off the heals of a multi-million dollar scandal costing billions in shareholder displacement as Disney wars with EA Games over their recent Star Wars Gambling fiasco involving investigation from the FTC and prompting legislators to organize. Legal questions begin to arise when titles are using players as funnels for cash in unrealistic systems designed to deceive and betray false sense of secure investment and trust in the art medium of video games.

Meanwhile, what’s left of the original Halo creators at their shell of a company (now owned by Activision and still called Bungie) has seen another high profile sci-fi fantasy online action shooter video game lying to players about the odds of obtaining experience, level ups, and rewards for their time put in. These systems of course, have been designed to be predatory for gamers of all ages in forcing them to pay to proceed in their games of choice rather than just play them.

Even worse, to pay for a “chance” to succeed and gain the items they need, but like a slot machine – there’s no guarantee they’ll win. Odds are not advertised, and behind-the-scenes scam systems have been patented by Activision themselves to deliberately trick players into illusions of gameplay experiences designed to get them paying more.

Editor’s Note: RealGamerNewZ has moved web servers, some older posts can no longer be commented on and have been preserved without their images. Thank you for your understanding in this matter. This article was written by Jon Ireson on 20171229 and was last modified on 20171230 .